daSlave'
One of the most amazing things about art is that it speaks to art. A painter sees a sculpture and takes inspiration. A musician hears a rhythm and samples it into a new piece. A visual artist reads words and pull them into pictures. To me, ek

macjhere:

11 tracks produced by 9th Wonder featuring samples by Bobby Womack. RIP.

This project has a silly amount of my favorite Little Brother beats. 9th is too nice. “Hiding Place”, “Speed”, …

fckyeahprettyafricans:

Senegal
Ghana
Nigeria
Gambia
Liberia  
https://twitter.com/question_ansah
https://twitter.com/Gechii_Baybee
https://twitter.com/Omieeee
blackhistoryalbum:

"Truth is….everybody is going to hurt you. You just gotta find the ones worth suffering for."—  Bob Marley

blackhistoryalbum:

"Truth is….everybody is going to hurt you. You just gotta find the ones worth suffering for."
—  Bob Marley

If you sought to advantage one group of Americans and disadvantage another, you could scarcely choose a more graceful method than housing discrimination. Housing determines access to transportation, green spaces, decent schools, decent food, decent jobs, and decent services. Housing affects your chances of being robbed and shot as well as your chances of being stopped and frisked. And housing discrimination is as quiet as it is deadly. It can be pursued through violence and terrorism, but it doesn’t need it. Housing discrimination is hard to detect, hard to prove, and hard to prosecute. Even today most people believe that Chicago is the work of organic sorting, as opposed segregationist social engineering. Housing segregation is the weapon that mortally injures, but does not bruise.
thesmithian:

lasergunsandcongodrums:

Working on this project to give to my mother. Doing a collection of dance photos. My mother is a dancer. For her birthday, I wanted to give her something special. She’s been my biggest inspiration as an artist. I’m going to launch it sometime next week. Getting prints made and framed to give to her. This is one of the first finished photos. 
Do I Move You?
by Spencer Charles
Dedicated to Susan Pope

[look of the hour]

thesmithian:

lasergunsandcongodrums:

Working on this project to give to my mother. Doing a collection of dance photos. My mother is a dancer. For her birthday, I wanted to give her something special. She’s been my biggest inspiration as an artist. I’m going to launch it sometime next week. Getting prints made and framed to give to her. This is one of the first finished photos. 

Do I Move You?

by Spencer Charles

Dedicated to Susan Pope

[look of the hour]

bktoatl:

Our Maafa (African Holocaust)



Husband consoles wife at the auction block.

David Newton’s superb memorial guarantees that these souls will forever be remembered in the universally honored spirit of triumph over adversity.

(David Newton’s Freedmen Memorial Park – Dallas, Texas)
 

riseandfallofapartheid:

"Big business largely snubbed the TRC. Few companies applied for amnesty, or disclosed their involvement in providing support to the apartheid regime." - Setumo Stone, Business Day 18 April 2014

As South Africans prepared to celebrate Freedom Day on the 27th April, marking the country’s first democratic election in 1994, and in the build-up to national elections on May 9th, Business Day reported that US businesses, Ford and IBM, lost a bid to stop victims from suing them in their own country - for allegedly aiding South Africa’s former apartheid regime.

In an another article in the Times of India this month, the Deputy Chair of the South African Human Rights Commission, said, “… mining companies, who benefited from South Africa’s labour system, did not pay compensation or even recognise their role in apartheid during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. They rejected Archbishop Tutu’s call for a minimal tax despite making millions at the cost of the land and people whose lives were destroyed.”

The role of business in supporting and benefiting from apartheid is evident in some startling images featured in Rise and Fall of Apartheid: Photography and the Bureaucracy of Everyday Life. The two here are:

Contract expired miners wearing ‘European’ clothes exit with their discharge papers as new recruits, many in tribal blankets, enter. 1958-1966. © The Ernest Cole Family Trust. Courtesy of the Hasselblad Foundation.

Photograph (c) gille de vlieg.  Cyril Ramaphosa and Harry Oppenheimer, opposing heads of the union and the biggest mining company, 1985.jpg

Pictures speak louder than words.

(It reminds one of the Confederates who went on about how slavery was a matter of states’ rights while insisting on a Fugitive Slave Act, which would put federal resources at the disposal of slave catchers, even in the streets of New York or Philadelphia.)